Sleep to Live CPAP Blog

Welcome to the Sleep to Live CPAP Blog! Here we will explore questions and answers about CPAP equipment, post important information about the CPAP world, and work with you to answer your questions. Feel free to comment and share your experience!

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NEW 10oz Travel CPAP

The PowerShell™ | Go anywhere, do anything cpap.

The PowerShell is the first fully integrated power solution for cpap users that need a totally portable, integrated power source. It is small enough to fit in the palm of your hand but has enough power for at least 8 hours of cord-free cpap.

  • Soft, padded 2mm neoprene skin over a solid plastic skeleton ensures a secure fit
  • Surrogate power plug for built-in charging using the standard Z1 power adapter
  • Insert the battery module and the Z1 to create an integrated form-factor.
  • Approved by the FAA for in-flight use.
  • At least 8 hours of battery power for most users. Get an undisturbed night of cpap.

. Posted in Information - Sleep to Live CPAP Blog

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'Beauty rest' effect of CPAP sleep apnea treatment

Getting a good night's rest can improve our health in many ways. And now, a new study published in the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine is the first of its kind to analyze how patients appear more alert, youthful and attractive after undergoing sleep apnea treatment for 2 months.

The treatment, called continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy, can stop snoring, improve alertness and reduce blood pressure by keeping the airway open through a stream of air delivered by a mask that is worn during sleep. 

It helps patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), which researchers say is a sleep illness that is linked to an increased risk of high blood pressure , heart disease , diabetes , depression and stroke

However, for some patients, sticking with the CPAP treatment can be a challenge because they must wear the breathing mask all through the night. 

After anecdotal stories about how patients appeared to look better after consistently following CPAP treatment, researchers led by Dr. Ronald D. Chervin, of the Sleep Disorders Center at the University of Michigan, decided to test whether improved facial appearance could be objectively measured in patients.

"We perceived that our CPAP patients often looked better, or reported that they'd been told they looked better, after treatment," says Dr. Chervin. "But no one has ever actually studied this."

Measurable facial improvements

The team studied 20 adult patients who had OSA and daytime sleepiness, and a plastic and reconstructive surgeon used a face-measuring system called "photogrammetry" to capture 3D digital photos of their faces before and 2 months after CPAP therapy. 

Not only did computer software analyze the volume and color of the patients' faces, but also 22 volunteers - a mix of both medical professionals and people from the community - rated the images for alertness, youthfulness and attractiveness.

Results of the study show that 68% of the raters characterized the post-treatment images as appearing more alert than before the treatment, while 67% said the images were more attractive and 64% rated them as more youthful.

Additionally, the image analysis found that there were decreases in forehead surface volume in the post-treatment images, which the researchers say could reflect changes in nightly fluid shift, and there was decreased redness under the eyes and cheeks.

Dr. Chervin adds:

"These results show that the subjective impression of many clinicians, namely that their patients look more alert and sometimes more youthful after treatment for obstructive sleep apnea, may well be something that can be perceived by many other people."

Vanity could boost consistent treatment

According to the researchers, this is the first study to show that these changes in facial appearance due to following sleep apnea treatment are noticeable to others.

"This may help convince patients to use their CPAP machines on a nightly basis," notes Dr. Chervin.

Alongside the measurements observed by the volunteers and the image analysis, the team said they noticed a reduction in forehead wrinkles after the treatment, but they did not have a way to measure these observations.

The researchers also note that they did not notice a big change in facial attributes that we normally associate with sleepiness, such as "blue circles or puffiness under the eyes."

Though he says that further research is needed over a longer period of CPAP treatment, Dr. Chervin adds:

"We want sleep to be on people's minds, and to educate them about the importance of getting enough sleep and getting attention for sleep disorders."

According to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, between 12 and 18 million US adults have untreated OSA.

. Posted in Information - Sleep to Live CPAP Blog

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New SleepWeaver Elan Nasal CPAP mask

SleepWeaver® Élan

The SleepWeaver® Élan soft-cloth nasal PAP mask features exhalation holes under the mask to match up with your natural nasal exhalation. The mask is angled so the exhalation doesn’t bother you or your bed partner.

Like our other masks, the SleepWeaver Élan incorporates the revolutionary Circadiance soft-cloth technology that quietly inflates like a balloon to create an airtight seal. The breathable, non-allergenic mask is comfortable—and it eliminates leaks, pressure points, sore spots, and pinching. Our “loose fit” prevents strap marks, and the open-face headgear design accommodates eyeglasses and allows virtually unrestricted vision—great for people who like to fall asleep while reading or watching TV!

About SleepWeaver Élan:

  • A 90° Elbow Swivel Connector, which allows for more natural sleeping positions and is easy to remove and clean. Exhalation holes in the front of the mask ensure a quiet and gentle flow of air.
  • Our exclusive FeatherWeight Tube®, which offers 45 cm of extension to reduce drag and provide a quick disconnect from the standard hose.
  • Quick, simple, and cost-effective replacement of the material that touches your skin.
  • Three sizes and a variety of styles—and colors!—for a mask that’s uniquely you.
  • High-tech material that allows the skin to breathe naturally, wicks away moisture, and leaves no pressure marks (unlike rubber or silicone seals).
  • A tether strap that lets you position the tube over your head—you can even route the tube over your headboard.

. Posted in Information - Sleep to Live CPAP Blog

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NEW ResMed Quattro Air for him and her

Introducing the new ResMed Quattro Air Full Face CPAP mask. Here are some of the features of this new lightweight mas:

Lighter, sleeker, simpler            

  • 45% lighter than the Mirage Quattro
  • Smaller facial footprint doesn’t feel heavy on the face

Quiet, comfortable seal for uninterrupted sleep             
  • Circular diffused vents gently directs away you and your bed partner for a quiet night’s sleep
  • Dual-wall cushion seals comfortably at sensitive nasal bridge area
  • Flex-wing forehead support auto-adjusts and features wide range of adjustment for the perfect fit
Fewer parts, fewer hassles             
  • Only four parts—the fewest of any leading full face mask—makes it easy to use and clean on a regular basis
  • Quick-release elbow allows for easy detachment from your device without having to take off the mask

. Posted in Information - Sleep to Live CPAP Blog

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Screening High-Risk Employees for Sleep Apnea Could Save a Corporation Millions of Dollars

Large corporations could save millions of dollars in lost productivity by screening and treating high-risk employees for obstructive sleep apnea, suggests new research presented on June 13, in Minneapolis, Minn., at Sleep 2011, the 25th Anniversary Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies LLC (APSS).

Results show that a large corporation in Florida could save an estimated $136 million in lost productivity over 10 years by screening high-risk employees for OSA and offering treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy. The study found that 608 employees of the corporation were middle-aged, obese men who were at high risk for OSA.

According to the authors, untreated OSA results in job performance deficiencies such as excessive sleepiness, cognitive dysfunction, irritability and reduced vitality. Research shows that work performance can be decreased by 30 percent due to sleep fragmentation and repetitive hypoxia, which are characteristics of OSA.

"This cost-benefit analysis proposed OSA screening and treatment for high-level management professionals who had high salaries," said principal investigator Dr. Clelia Lima, a family nurse practitioner in the College of Nursing at the University of Central Florida in Orlando, Fla. "It was a pleasant surprise to find that the results showed substantial financial benefit for employees at practically any salary level."

Lima and co-investigator Dr. Elizabeth M. Rash, who is also a nurse practitioner, applied epidemiological data related to OSA screening, diagnosis and treatment to the specific demographics of the corporation. They based their calculations on statistics that 70 percent of high-risk individuals are diagnosed with OSA, and that 75 percent of patients with OSA are compliant with CPAP therapy. Therefore, they estimated that 319 of the 608 high-risk employees would have OSA and be compliant with treatment.

Then Lima and Rash made conservative statistical estimates, considering lost work productivity as the variable and using half of its predicted value. For each of the 319 treated employees, productivity was estimated at $150,000 per year. Recovering the 30 percent of productivity that was lost due to OSA would yield an annual gain of $14.4 million. Estimating the cost of diagnostic screening with polysomnography and treatment with CPAP therapy to be $7.2 million over 10 years, Lima and Rash determined that the corporation would have a 10-year net savings of $136 million.

Lima added that both companies and employees reap benefits when OSA is diagnosed and treated.

"Companies may become proactive in screening and treating their employees for OSA due to the predicted financial benefit," she said. "The importance goes beyond the improved cognitive function and savings of millions of dollars in work performance, since treating OSA adds other health benefits."

According to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, it is estimated that about 80 to 90 percent of adults with OSA remain undiagnosed. OSA is a sleep-related breathing disorder that involves a decrease or complete halt in airflow despite an ongoing effort to breathe. It occurs when the muscles relax during sleep, causing soft tissue in the back of the throat to collapse and block the upper airway. This leads to partial reductions (hypopneas) and complete pauses (apneas) in breathing that can produce abrupt reductions in blood oxygen saturation and reduce blood flow to the brain. Most people with OSA snore loudly and frequently, and they often experience excessive daytime sleepiness.

The treatment of choice for OSA is CPAP therapy, which provides a steady stream of air through a mask that is worn during sleep. This airflow keeps the airway open to prevent pauses in breathing and restore normal oxygen levels. Help for OSA is available at more than 2,200 AASM-accredited sleep disorders centers across the U.S.

. Posted in Information - Sleep to Live CPAP Blog

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Risk of Death Is High in Older Adults With Sleep Apnea and Daytime Sleepiness, Study Finds

A study in the April 1 issue of the journal Sleep suggests that the risk of death is more than two times higher in older adults who have sleep apnea and report struggling with excessive daytime sleepiness.

Results of adjusted proportional hazards modeling show that older adults with moderate to severe sleep apnea who reported struggling with excessive daytime sleepiness at baseline were more than twice as likely to die (hazard ratio = 2.28) as subjects who had neither problem. The risk of death was insignificant in older adults with only excessive daytime sleepiness (HR = 1.11) or sleep apnea (HR = 0.74). Participants had a mean age of 78 years at baseline, and about 55 percent (n = 160) died during an average follow-up period of 14 years.

"Excessive daytime sleepiness, when associated with sleep apnea, can significantly increase the risk of death in older adults," said principal investigator and lead author Dr. Nalaka S. Gooneratne, assistant professor of medicine in the University of Pennsylvania Health System in Philadelphia, Pa. "We did not find that being sleepy in and of itself was a risk. Instead, the risk of increased mortality only seemed to occur when sleep apnea was also present."

Gooneratne added that both daytime sleepiness and sleep apnea are common problems, with sleep apnea affecting up to 20 percent of older adults.

According to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, the most common form of sleep apnea is obstructive sleep apnea, which occurs when soft tissue in the back of the throat collapses and blocks the upper airway during sleep. Older adults also are at risk for central sleep apnea, which involves a repetitive absence of breathing effort during sleep caused by a dysfunction in the central nervous system or the heart. Only four percent of participants had central sleep apnea, and there was no meaningful change in the results when they were excluded from the analysis.

The study involved 289 adults with neither dementia nor depression who were recruited from the community. Seventy-four percent were female. About half (n = 146) had significant levels of excessive daytime sleepiness at baseline, reporting that they felt sleepy or struggled to stay awake during the daytime at least three to four times a week. Sleep apnea was measured objectively by one night of polysomnography in a sleep lab. For analysis, participants were included in the sleep apnea group only if they had an apnea-hypopnea index of 20 or more breathing pauses per hour of sleep, which represents a moderate to severe level of sleep apnea.

Participants were recruited between 1993 and 1998. Survival status was determined by searching the social security death index, with follow-up ending Sept. 1, 2009.

According to the authors, the mechanism by which sleep apnea and excessive daytime sleepiness increase the risk of death is unclear. They suspect that inflammation may be involved, which could increase the risk of other medical problems such as hypertension. It also remains to be seen if treatment reduces the risk of death.

"Future research is needed to assess whether treating the sleep apnea can reduce mortality," said Gooneratne.

The treatment of choice for OSA is CPAP therapy, which provides a steady stream of air through a mask that is worn during sleep. This airflow keeps the airway open to prevent pauses in breathing and restore normal oxygen levels.

The study was supported by the National Institutes of Health through the National Institute on Aging and the National Center for Research Resources.

. Posted in Information - Sleep to Live CPAP Blog

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CPAP Therapy Reduces Fatigue, Increases Energy in Patients With Sleep Apnea, Study Suggests

ScienceDaily (Jan. 3, 2011) — Patients with obstructive sleep apnea often report that they feel like "a new person" after beginning treatment with continuous positive airway pressure therapy. A new study in the Jan. 1 issue of the journal Sleep provides objective evidence to support these anecdotal reports, showing that three weeks of CPAP therapy significantly reduced fatigue and increased energy in patients with OSA.

Results of the randomized controlled trial show that CPAP therapy significantly reduced self-reported, mean fatigue scores on two independent measures: from 8.76 at baseline to -0.10 post-treatment on the Multidimensional Fatigue Symptom Inventory -- Short Form; and from 7.17 at baseline to 4.03 post-treatment on the fatigue-inertia subscale of the Profile of Mood States -- Short Form. These results indicate that participants were no longer suffering from clinically significant levels of fatigue after the three-week intervention period.

Self-reported energy levels also increased after three weeks of CPAP therapy, with the mean score on the vigor-activity subscale of the Profile of Mood States -- Short Form increasing significantly from 14.28 at baseline to 16.52 post-treatment. Significant changes in fatigue and energy were not observed in participants who received placebo CPAP.

"This was one of the first double-blind studies of the effects of CPAP on fatigue," said lead author Lianne Tomfohr, graduate research assistant in the joint doctoral program at San Diego State University and the University of California, San Diego. "These results are important, as they highlight that patients who comply with CPAP therapy can find relief from fatigue and experience increases in energy and vigor after a relatively short treatment period."

Further analysis found that CPAP appeared to be especially beneficial for participants who were excessively fatigued or sleepy before treatment. CPAP therapy significantly reduced self-reported daytime sleepiness in this group, with their mean score on the Epworth Sleepiness Scale dropping from 13.0 at baseline to 8.9 post-treatment.

According to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, OSA is a common sleep-related breathing disorder that affects at least two to four percent of the adult population. OSA occurs when the muscles relax during sleep, causing soft tissue in the back of the throat to collapse and block the upper airway. Most people with OSA snore loudly and frequently, and they often experience fatigue and excessive daytime sleepiness.

The treatment of choice for OSA is CPAP therapy, which provides a steady stream of air through a mask that is worn during sleep. This airflow keeps the airway open to prevent pauses in breathing and restore normal oxygen levels.

Tomfohr and a team of UCSD researchers studied 59 adults with a mean age of 48 years. Overnight polysomnography in a sleep lab confirmed that each participant had OSA, which was defined as having an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) of 10 or more partial reductions (hypopneas) and complete pauses (apneas) in breathing per hour of sleep.

Participants were randomly assigned to receive either therapeutic CPAP or placebo CPAP, and they returned to the sleep lab for a night of either CPAP titration or mock titration. Participants were trained on the use of the equipment and instructed to use it at home each night for three weeks. Questionnaire data were obtained prior to study randomization and after the three-week intervention period.

According to the authors, the mechanisms that underlie the observed changes in fatigue are unclear. They speculate that CPAP may impact fatigue in patients with OSA by reducing inflammation, noting that increases in inflammatory markers in OSA patients have been related to elevated fatigue.

. Posted in Information - Sleep to Live CPAP Blog

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Risk of Death Is High in Older Adults With Sleep Apnea and Daytime Sleepiness, Study Finds

A study in the April 1 issue of the journal Sleep suggests that the risk of death is more than two times higher in older adults who have sleep apnea and report struggling with excessive daytime sleepiness.

Results of adjusted proportional hazards modeling show that older adults with moderate to severe sleep apnea who reported struggling with excessive daytime sleepiness at baseline were more than twice as likely to die (hazard ratio = 2.28) as subjects who had neither problem. The risk of death was insignificant in older adults with only excessive daytime sleepiness (HR = 1.11) or sleep apnea (HR = 0.74). Participants had a mean age of 78 years at baseline, and about 55 percent (n = 160) died during an average follow-up period of 14 years.

"Excessive daytime sleepiness, when associated with sleep apnea, can significantly increase the risk of death in older adults," said principal investigator and lead author Dr. Nalaka S. Gooneratne, assistant professor of medicine in the University of Pennsylvania Health System in Philadelphia, Pa. "We did not find that being sleepy in and of itself was a risk. Instead, the risk of increased mortality only seemed to occur when sleep apnea was also present."

Gooneratne added that both daytime sleepiness and sleep apnea are common problems, with sleep apnea affecting up to 20 percent of older adults.

According to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, the most common form of sleep apnea is obstructive sleep apnea, which occurs when soft tissue in the back of the throat collapses and blocks the upper airway during sleep. Older adults also are at risk for central sleep apnea, which involves a repetitive absence of breathing effort during sleep caused by a dysfunction in the central nervous system or the heart. Only four percent of participants had central sleep apnea, and there was no meaningful change in the results when they were excluded from the analysis.

The study involved 289 adults with neither dementia nor depression who were recruited from the community. Seventy-four percent were female. About half (n = 146) had significant levels of excessive daytime sleepiness at baseline, reporting that they felt sleepy or struggled to stay awake during the daytime at least three to four times a week. Sleep apnea was measured objectively by one night of polysomnography in a sleep lab. For analysis, participants were included in the sleep apnea group only if they had an apnea-hypopnea index of 20 or more breathing pauses per hour of sleep, which represents a moderate to severe level of sleep apnea.

Participants were recruited between 1993 and 1998. Survival status was determined by searching the social security death index, with follow-up ending Sept. 1, 2009.

According to the authors, the mechanism by which sleep apnea and excessive daytime sleepiness increase the risk of death is unclear. They suspect that inflammation may be involved, which could increase the risk of other medical problems such as hypertension. It also remains to be seen if treatment reduces the risk of death.

"Future research is needed to assess whether treating the sleep apnea can reduce mortality," said Gooneratne.

The treatment of choice for OSA is CPAP therapy, which provides a steady stream of air through a mask that is worn during sleep. This airflow keeps the airway open to prevent pauses in breathing and restore normal oxygen levels.

The study was supported by the National Institutes of Health through the National Institute on Aging and the National Center for Research Resources.

. Posted in Information - Sleep to Live CPAP Blog

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Transcend Solar Battery Charger

Finally all Transcend users are getting what they asked for. Transcend has introduced its new Solar Cahrger for its Battery packs. This panel is for the Transcend Battery packs only. It is extremely lightweight and charges your battery quickly.

The Transcend Portable Solar Charger™ recharges your Transcend P8™ or P4™ batteries under the sun so you can rely on CPAP therapy under the stars. The solar modules begin charging the battery immediately when placed in the sun, even in low light conditions. And what’s greener than free power? Rolled up, it’s about the size of a small, folded newspaper and easily stows for your next outdoor adventure. Transcend innovation is changing the way sleep apnea therapy is delivered.

The Transcend P8™ and P4™ batteries provide backup power during storms and brown outs for uninterrupted therapy. It’s also perfect for use in remote locations where power is unavailable. Ensure you’ll always have the energy you need, whether you’re on the road or at home.

Transcend P8™ Multi-Night Battery -12 hours for full charge from completely depleted cells (in full, direct-sun conditions)*

Transcend P4™ Overnight Battery -6 hours for full charge from completely depleted cells (in full, direct-sun conditions)*

Specifications-

• Folded in.(mm) 10.5 x 3.5 x 2 (267 x 89 x 51)

• Unfolded in.(mm) 30 x 21 (762 x 533)

• Weighs lbs.(kg) 1 lb (0.45)

 

. Posted in Information - Sleep to Live CPAP Blog

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New Nasal Pillow Mask By Fisher & Paykel

Fisher & Paykel have introduced its newest set of light weight masks. The lightest of them all is the new Pilario Nasal Pillow CPAP mask system.

The F&P Pilairo is light on the patient, is big on performance, and is our lightest nasal pillows mask (1.83 ounces). The Pilairo integrates a new self-inflating AirPillow™ Seal and minimalist Stetchwise™ Headgear. As a result, the patient experiences freedom of movement coupled with stability they can trust.

The design of the F&P Pilairo was inspired by the aerodynamic flight of the world’s lightest little bird – the hummingbird. The hummingbird can rotate its fine wings in a circle; it is the only bird able to fly forwards, backwards, up, down and sideways and can hover in midair. This drove the design of a mask seal which self-inflates around the nares in a ‘hover-like way’ while providing total freedom of movement.

Experience easier therapy with F&P Pilairo.

•                     Oneconvenient size.

•                     Quickand easy to fit.

•                     Nomore messy straps and no complicated headgear adjustments necessary

•                     Onlythree simple parts to clean

. Posted in Information - Sleep to Live CPAP Blog

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Are There CPAP and APAP Machines For Truckers, Pilots, and Drivers?

Are There Any CPAP or APAP Machines That Are Made Specifically For Commercial Drivers or the Transportation Industry?

Much has been studied and written lately about the high correlation to commercial driving or flying and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA).  Untreated sleep disorders and Excessive Daytime Sleepiness (EDS) in Commercial Drivers, Commercial Pilots and Aitraffic Controllers can lead to deadly mistakes and accidents; therefore it is important to properly diagnose and treat these conditions.

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) has renewed its campaign to treat OSA across all modes of transportation - air, rail, marine, and trucking - as part of a long-term effort to significantly reduce the negative effects of fatigue.

CPAP and Auto-PAP Solutions for Truckers, Pilots, and Commercial Drivers

Activa Medical continues to receive many inquiries about whether or not there are specific CPAP or A-PAP machines for Pilots, Drivers, Truckers, etc.  The short answer is yes…and no.  In terms of the underlying condition, OSA, Pilots, Drivers and Truckers can be and are diagnosed just like anyone else would be.  There is nothing occupation-specific about their treatment with CPAP, BiPAP or APAP.  However, there are a few unique considerations for this group to consider before purchasing their CPAP or APAP machine -- portability, humidification, and heated air.

Pilots generally will need humidification to offset the dry air of an airplane or hotel room.  Commercial Drivers that have northern routes may want to consider heated tubing to make sure the cold ambient air doesn’t continue to wake them while they are sleeping.  And all groups will probably want to consider the smaller, lighter machines to make travel easier.  Short of those considerations, the CPAP and APAP machines are not unique to them. 

Activa Medical offers a broad selection of CPAP and APAP machines that meet these requirements of portability, humidification and heated air or tubing.  Please visit www.activa-medical.com/CPAP-Machines.html to see a full line of CPAP machines with hundreds of customer reviews and detailed specifications.

. Posted in Information - Sleep to Live CPAP Blog

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